Prison Life Warrants Extra Time for Filing Court Papers, Court Rules Zorislav R. Leyderman on Feb 28, 2017

Zorislav R. Leyderman Feb 28, 2017

In Munt v. Larson, 15-cv-582 (SRN/SER) (D. Minn.), Mr. Munt is suing various Minnesota Department of Corrections (DOC) officials for Eighth Amendment violations in United States District Court, District of Minnesota. Mr. Munt is pro se, which means that he is representing himself in court. The DOC Defendants filed a request to have the case dismissed on summary judgment and, pursuant to court rules, Mr. Munt was required to file a response within 21 days. (LR 7.1.) Mr. Munt requested more time, claiming that he was unable to comply with the short deadline due to various prison restrictions.

According to the Court’s order, “Munt contends that . . . prison rules mean that three weeks are required just to complete printing of the documents he intends to file . . .” The Judge granted Mr. Munt’s request and allowed him additional seven weeks to submit his response.

“The Court recognizes that Munt’s incarceration places special burdens on his ability to promptly reply to certain filings.”

Motivated . . . by interests of justice, the Court . . . grants Munt an additional seven weeks in which to prepare and file his response.”

Thus, the Court correctly acknowledged that prison is not an ideal setting for complying with short deadlines and that special accommodations should be allowed to ensure that all are treated equally under the law.

Click here for Judge’s full Order.